Forthcoming webinars - information and registration.

Presenter: Federica Braga (IT)
Moderator: Anne Stavelin (NO)

Date: 17th April 2018 at 18:00 CET

Registration is open (enter the course to register).

How to enter the course?

The participation to EQA schemes that meet specific metrological criteria is mandatory for the evaluation of performance of participating laboratories in terms of standardization and clinical suitability of their measurements. The requirements for this type of EQA are as follows: in addition to the use of commutable control materials, it is necessary to assign values (and uncertainty) to them with reference measurement procedures (RMP) performed by an accredited laboratory and to define and apply clinically allowable performance specifications to verify the suitability of laboratory measurements in a clinical setting. Unfortunately, there are few permanent EQA programs covering these requirements because some practical constraints including technical, psychological and economic aspects, which limit their introduction. It is, however, clear that these aspects should be immediately solved. Indeed, EQA schemes are in a unique position to add substantial value to the practice of Laboratory Medicine, by identifying analytes that need improved harmonization and by stimulating and sustaining standardization initiatives that are needed to support clinical practice guidelines. This will definitively help those manufacturers that produce superior products to demonstrate the superiority of those products and oblige users (and consequently industry) to abandon assays with demonstrated insufficient quality.


Speaker: Michael Cornes (UK)
Moderator:

Date: 15th May 2018 at 18:00 CET

Registration is open (enter the course to register).

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Abstract:

Speaker: Michael Cornes (UK)
Moderator:

Date: 15th May 2018 at 18:00 CET

Abstract

National and international (WHO, CLSI) guidelines recommended that order of draw of blood during phlebotomy should be blood culture/sterile tubes, then plain tubes/gel tubes, then tubes containing additives. This prevents contamination of sample tubes with additives from previous tubes for example sodium citrate or more commonly potassium EDTA (K3EDTA).

These recommendations are based on a case report by and a follow up study by Calam and Cooper in 1982 which reported that incorrect order of draw caused hyperkalaemia and hypocalcaemia. By measuring EDTA, it has been demonstrated that reverse order of draw of blood samples using closed loop venesection systems does not cause EDTA contamination. It is difficult to reconcile the directly conflicting results of these studies but it may be that reversed order of draw using poor technique and/or difficult venepuncture may result in sample tube cross-contamination.

It has been shown that contamination is still relatively common and may be difficult to identify. As this is not due to reversed order of draw of blood samples in a closed loop system other mechanisms must be in operation. Here I will present the evidence for and against the need to follow an order of draw.

Speaker: Stephen Church (BD)
Moderator: Zorica Sumarac (SRB)

Date: 18th September 2018 at 18:00 CET

Registration is open (enter the course to register).

How to enter the course?

Abstract: to be added


Speaker: Pieter Vermeersch (BE)
Moderator: Janne Cadamuro (AT)

Date: 27th November 2018 at 18:00 CET

Registration is open (enter the course to register).

How to enter the course?

Abstract: to be added